Classic and vintage car stage rally in Mashhad



TEHRAN – On Friday, dozens of classic and vintage cars staged a rally in Mashhad, the capital of Khorasan Razavi province, which hosted a conference of Iranian and Iraqi tourism activists, the provincial deputy tourism chief said.

More than 250 historic and vintage vehicles, including those manufactured by Mercedes Benz, BMW and American companies, took part in the rally on the last day of the conference, Yousef Bidkhori announced on Saturday.

Conference attendees visited the cars, some of which had been transferred from Tehran to Mashhad, the official added.

The three-day conference was organized to introduce the tourism potentials and attractions of the province to Iraqi travel insiders as well as to deepen the ties between the two countries in tourism.

Earlier this week, Deputy Tourism Minister Ali-Reza Shalbafian announced that Iran was preparing to welcome more Iraqi tourists, pilgrims and medical travelers.

“The Ministry of Cultural Heritage, Tourism and Handicrafts seeks to introduce Iraqi travelers to other lesser-known destinations and to increase the length of their stay,” he noted.

Tehran and Baghdad agreed in September to ease strict visa restrictions as a step forward in expanding bilateral ties.

The announcement came after Iranian President Seyyed Ebrahim Raisi and Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi met in Tehran, discussing various issues, including visa waiver, a joint rail project and raising the level. Exchanges.

Before the coronavirus pandemic, Iraqis were the biggest source of tourists to Iran. In return, hundreds of thousands of Iranian pilgrims head to the holy Iraqi cities of Najaf and Karbala each year to witness the Arbaeen pilgrimage, aka the Arbaeen trek, to mark the end of the 40-day mourning period. following the martyrdom of Imam Hussein (AS), the grandson of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh).

ABU / AFM


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